University at Buffalo
The Witebsky Center

The Witebsky Center
 
 
University at Buffalo
Bacteriology hostmicrobe immunology parasitology virology bioinformatics mycology
The Witebsky Center The Witebsky Center
About The Witebsky Center
Student Poster Session

The Witebsky Center for Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology is housed on two-and-a-half floors in the Biomedical Research Building on the South Campus of the University at Buffalo.  In addition to twenty-one well-equipped 1100 sq. ft. laboratory suites, additional common equipment rooms, offices, and conference facilities, a BL3 suite and a sterile pathogen-free animal handling facility are available for studies on significant human pathogens and immuno-compromised animals.  These state-of-the-art laboratories provide the infrastructure required to tackle the most challenging new problems.

Graduate and post-doctoral training opportunities abound in the Witebsky Center for Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology.  Students may choose challenging research topics in areas as diverse as the fundamentals of protein structure and function or nucleic acid replication to immunological interplay between a pathogen and its host at the organismal level.  Many collaborative projects which permit close interaction between students and multiple principal investigators.  Common scientific interchanges are fostered by a weekly group research meeting, and an annual research retreat.  Exposure to current research happenings is provided by additional departmental seminars and the medical school Distinguished Scientist Program.  The Center also hosts annual regional conferences in Microbial Pathogenesis, DNA Replication and Repair, and Immunology, featuring distinguished guest lecturers, and each attended by over 100 participants from the Western New York/Niagara Frontier region -- and beyond.  For current information on these meetings, follow the links in the panel to the left.

The Witebsky Center for Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology is therefore well positioned to play a leading role in the biomedical research enterprise of the University at Buffalo, and to have significant impact on the challenging problems of emerging as well as familiar infectious diseases and humanity's defenses against them.

 

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