Integrated Curriculum


The Jacobs School of Medicine at the University at Buffalo features an Integrated Medical School Curriculum. The integrated curriculum was first fully experienced by the class of 2005. It replaced the traditional departmentally based, lecture intensive, coursework of the past. This new milieu reduces contact hours and didactic teacher centered education with an emphasis on integration of the basic sciences, increased clinical relevance, and self-directed learning.

ANA-500-O GROSS HUMAN ANATOMY
6 credits; Year 1; Fall semester

Required course for freshman medical students. Dr. Hard, Dr. Kolega, and Staff. This course is designed to examine the nature and organization of the structural components of the dissected human body. The course emphasizes the normal functions of the components, particularly as these relate to the clinical management of patients. The course is composed of lectures and demonstrations, laboratories, and clinical correlations. Lectures and demonstrations are given by the Gross Anatomy staff. These involve a presentation of the anatomical details along with their general functions and clinical relevance. In the laboratory, teams of students, under the guidance of the faculty, dissect and present the anatomical detail and general organization of the assigned regions to the other students. These gross anatomical structures are also identified on radiographs, CAT-scans, motion pictures, and special dissections, highlighting the manner in which most non-surgical physicians will later see the anatomic entities. The order of dissection is designed to permit progressively greater correlation with microscopic and developmental anatomy as the course proceeds. Clinical correlations are also presented throughout the course to augment the material in each region. By the end of the course, the gross anatomy of the entire human body will have been surveyed. Experience gained by dissection should permit students to relate the anatomy to the pathophysiology of disease and the radiologic analysis of regions of interest.


IDM-520/521 CLINICAL PRACTICE OF MEDICINE (CPM)
4 credits each; Year 1; Fall & Spring semester

Required course of freshman medical students. Dr. Andrew Symons. The Clinical Practice of Medicine is a two-year course that is designed to provide students with the fundamental knowledge and skills required in clinical practice. During the first year of this course, students learn basic skills that are essential for clinical medicine, including medical interviewing, the performance of a physical examination, and the medical write-up. Working in seminar groups and with community-based physicians, students will focus in the fall semester on developing patient-centered communication skills, and the challenges of medical interviewing. In the spring semester, continuing with seminar groups and preceptorships, the focus is primarily in developing physical examination skills. At the end of year one, there is a clinical competency examination where students demonstrate and confirm skill attainment.


IMC-500 MEDICINE AND SOCIETY
2 credits; Year 1; Fall semester

Required course for freshman medical students. Dr Li. This foundation course for entering medical students begins the process of the study of medicine in an integrated curriculum. The student is exposed to issues regarding the role of the physician in society, followed by issues in the prevention of disease in a population. The student will acquire the lifelong skills to critically appraise and integrate the best evidence into clinical practice through the application of evidence-based medicine and the use of concepts underlying epidemiology and biostatistics.


IMC-502 FUNDAMENTALS I: MOLECULES, CELLS AND MOLECULAR GENETICS
8 credits; Year 1; Fall semester

Required course for freshman medical students. Drs. Ettinger, O'Brian, Campbell?? & Cotter. This required foundation module covers the fundamental structure-functional properties of proteins, cells, and genes. Basic mechanisms of signal transduction in response to neural, chemical and growth factor signals are also presented.


IMC-504 FUNDAMENTALS II: UNDERLYING PRINCIPLES OF DISEASE
10 credits; Year 1; Fall semester

Required course for freshman medical students. Dr. Brownie and Staff. This foundation block addresses basic issues of Biochemistry, Physiology, and Pharmacology and their roles in health and disease. In conjunction with the other courses of the first semester, this course builds the underpinnings of basic science to enable students to begin an integrated system based curriculum.


IMC-510 INTEGRATED STUDY OF THE GASTROINTESTINAL SYSTEM AND METABOLISM: G.I. AND METABOLISM
7 credits; Year 1; Spring semester

Required course for freshman medical students. Drs. Michael Duffey, Alexander Brownie and Tom Mahl This required system-based block integrates the basic sciences into the study of the gastrointestinal system and metabolism in both health and disease. Each of the basic science topics is incorporated into an integrated body of knowledge utilizing both didactic and self-directed learning methods, and clinical models.


IMC-512 INTEGRATED STUDY OF THE URINARY TRACT AND RENAL SYSTEM
6 credits; Year 1; Spring semester

Required course for freshman medical students. Drs. Lohr and Awayda. This required system based block integrates the basic sciences into a study of the urinary tract and renal system in both health and disease. Each of the basic science topics is incorporated into an integrated body of knowledge utilizing both didactic and self-directed learning methods, and clinical models.


IMC-514 INTEGRATED STUDY OF THE MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM AND INTEGUMENT
4 credits; Year 1; Spring semester

Required course for freshman medical students. Dr. Reid Heffner. This required system based block integrates the basic sciences into a study of the musculoskeletal system and integument in both health and disease. Each of the basic science topics is incorporated into an integrated body of knowledge utilizing both didactic and self-directed learning methods, and clinical models.


IMC-516 HOST DEFENCES AND HEMATOLOGY
5 credits; Year 1; Spring Semester

Dr. Lesse, Dr. Lehman, and Dr. Steinbrenner. Sometimes referred to as Fundamentals III, this module is the first module of the spring semester of first year. This course introduces the disciplines of microbiology and the pathogens that threaten the host. The host defenses to those pathogens and the development of immunity and immune recognition are covered in the next three weeks in the immunology portion. The science of pathology and pathophysiology are introduced as the immunology block turns toward autoimmunity and immunologic recognition of cancer, and the module concludes with the first of the truly system based instruction in hematology and the understanding of basic and advanced hematologic principles.


IDM-620/521 CLINICAL PRACTICE OF MEDICINE II (CPM-II)
4 credits each; Year 1; Fall & Spring semester

Required course of second year medical students. Dr. Nasir Khan. The Clinical Practice of Medicine is a two-year course that is designed to provide students with the fundamental knowledge and skills required in clinical practice. A primary focus of CPM-Year II will be the refinement of the skills learned thus far at the patient bedside. Throughout the year, you will work on an every other week basis with a faculty preceptor and will have repeated opportunities to interview and examine patients, some of whom will be in a hospital (in-patient) setting. During the fall semester, you will also receive hands-on training in the musculoskeletal, neurologic, gynecologic, and male genitourinary in addition to more detailed aspects of the eye & ENT exam and a session on breaking bad news compassionately. This training will be achieved through a series of lectures and small group demonstration sessions.


IMC-602 INTEGRATED STUDY OF THE HUMAN CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM
8 credits; Year 2; Fall semester

Required course for sophomore medical students. Dr. Hogan and Staff. This course provides instruction into the mechanisms of operation of the human cardiovascular system. Emphasis is placed on the integration of relevant principles from anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathology, pharmacology and microbiology with respect to the behavior of the normal circulation and its responses to the stress of injury and disease. Both expert-directed and student-directed methodologies will be employed in this module and a select set of clinical cases will be used to guide instruction.


IMC-604 INTEGRATED STUDY OF THE PULMONARY SYSTEM
8 credits; Year 2; Fall semester

Required course for sophomore medical students. Drs. Alan Saltzman and Linda Wild. This required system-based block integrates the basic sciences into a study of the pulmonary system in both health and disease. Each of the basic science topics is incorporated into an integrated body of knowledge utilizing both didactic and self-directed learning methods, and clinical models.


IMC-606 & IMC 610 INTEGRATED STUDY OF NEUROSCIENCE AND BEHAVIOR I & II
12 credits; Year 2; Fall & Spring semesters

Required course for sophomore medical students. Dr. Cohan and Staff. This system-based block integrates the basic sciences into a study of neuroscience and behavior in both health and disease. Each of the basic science topics is incorporated into an integrated body of knowledge covering neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurological correlations, neuropharmacology, neuropathology, human behavior and psychiatry, utilizing both didactic and self-directed learning methods and clinical models.


IMC-612 INTEGRATED STUDY OF THE ENDOCRINE & REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEMS & LIFE CYCLE
10 credits; Year 2; Spring semester

Required course for sophomore medical students. Drs. Peter Bradford, Alexander Brownie and A. John Ryan. This required system-based block integrates the basic sciences into a study of the endocrine and reproductive systems in both health and disease. Each of the basic science topics is incorporated into an integrated body of knowledge utilizing both didactic and self-directed learning methods, and clinical models.

Contact Info

Office of Medical Education
40 Biomedical Education Building
3435 Main Street
Buffalo, New York 14214

P: (716) 829-2802
F: (716) 829-2798


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New Jacobs School of Medicine